Category Archives: rural settings

There’s hidden talent in those rice fields

Given the chance, what might he be capable of?

I recently wrote about DDD Battambang which is bringing IT jobs to rural Cambodia, a place traditionally known for farming. In response to this business, one could reasonably raise a concern about the talent pool. Will the people really be there to make such a business work, and furthermore will they have had sufficient experience and education to get up to speed?

These are certainly valid questions, and they bring to mind an important but relatively unknown book about talent written by a gentleman named Elliott Jacques. In his book Human Capability, Jacques makes a point which is of great interest to social enterprise. He states that one’s talent trajectory, for instance how far ability-wise one can get as a manager, is as intrinsic as one’s eventual height. That as long as a person isn’t malnourished or abused, their leadership talent will develop as they age, whether or not they have had education or leadership opportunities.

Thus in disadvantaged areas, we can expect that there are a number of undiscovered, under-leveraged people who could be doing great work on the global business stage, if they just had the opportunity. That even though they may not have had great education or work opportunities, their innate talent lies ready and waiting for action. This is great news for social enterprise, which faces a variety of challenges in competing with a normal for-profit company. The ready availability of such a talent pool can really make a social enterprise competitive in the market place.

When I was in Cambodia, I had the pleasure of meeting several people like this, who are talented, who hadn’t had good work opportunities before DDD, and who are very happy to have the opportunity to do global work in a rural setting near their families.

I believe there is great potential for a variety of other service delivery businesses to base in rural locations. It will take dedication, problem solving, and knowledge sharing to help move these efforts forward.

btw If you’re interested in learning more about the book “Human Capability,” check out my Amazon review that describes his unique way of identifying leadership talent.

From farmers to information workers: DDD Battambang brings IT jobs to the heartland

Rice farming in Cambodia

Potential information workers?

Last November I was in Battambang, Cambodia facilitating public speaking workshops for the local management staff of the local Digital Divide Data (DDD) office. Although DDD has several other offices, the Battambang office is the only one located in the countryside, and as such is very interesting from a development point of view.

Much of staff comes from the countryside, either around Battambang or from neighboring provinces, and thus grew up in a farming family. People from these backgrounds typically have limited employment options. They are faced with either continuing the family business in farming, finding a factory job, or moving away from family in search of employment. But for high achieving people these aren’t great options.

Furthermore my informal conversations revealed that farming just “ain’t what it used to be” in terms of its predictability and profitability as a business. Say what you will about climate change—the farmers are noticing changes that are directly impacting them, making farming a riskier and more complicated venture. Plus I have to wonder how lucrative small-scale, small investment farming can be on a sustainable basis, with farm products being sold more and more as a global market.

As I was travelling between Phnom Penh and Battambang I noticed a few factories along the way in rural areas. And yes, while factories are a way to employ a large number of people, they aren’t going to properly tap into the latent talent that is in the community, looking for an outlet.

And moving to the big city, while it may sound promising, is a decidedly mixed bag for many people. Consider that in a family oriented culture such as Cambodia, it’s particularly tough to leave family behind and move away to a big city where accommodation is expensive and where the traditional family safety net isn’t there. Nonetheless your smartest folks, who would be natural community and family leaders, will be that much more likely to move away from the countryside to the big city in search of employment opportunities. The result is a brain drain.

Now in this day and age of technology and remote working arrangements, in theory it ought to be possible to locate outsourcing centers in rural areas. There should be an opportunity to tap into attractive cost structures and a smart, motivated, untapped workforce.

But there are barriers to overcome. How would one jump-start the talent pool, in order to get such an organization off on the right foot? What special challenges would come up from training a rural workforce? And would international clients be comfortable trusting work to a location that was difficult to visit?

And yet one way or another, DDD Battambang has managed to overcome these hurdles and create a thriving rural BPO office in the countryside of Cambodia. It’s quiet, it’s peaceful, there’s fresh air. It’s a pleasant place to live.

I think this is just the beginning—rural BPO could have a big impact for many other places, and other services as well.

 

From farmers to information workers: DDD Battambang brings IT jobs to the heartland

Last November I was in Battambang, Cambodia facilitating public speaking workshops for the local management staff of the local Digital Divide Data (DDD) office. Although DDD has several other offices, the Battambang office is the only one located in the countryside, and as such is very interesting from a development point of view.

Much of staff comes from the countryside, either around Battambang or from neighboring provinces, and thus grew up in a farming family. People from these backgrounds typically have limited employment options. They are faced with either continuing the family business in farming, finding a factory job, or moving away from family in search of employment. But for high achieving people these aren’t great options.

Furthermore my informal conversations revealed that farming just “ain’t what it used to be” in terms of its predictability and profitability as a business. Say what you will about climate change—the farmers are noticing changes that are directly impacting them, making farming a riskier and more complicated venture. Plus I have to wonder how lucrative small scale, small investment farming can be on a sustainable basis, with farm products being sold more and more as a global market.

As I was travelling between Phnom Penh and Battambang I noticed a few factories along the way in rural areas. And yes, while factories are a way to employ a large number of people, they aren’t going to properly tap into the latent talent that is in the community, looking for an outlet.

And moving to the big city, while it may sound promising, is a decidedly mixed bag for many people. Consider that in a family-oriented culture such as Cambodia, it’s particularly tough to leave family behind and move away to a big city where accommodation is expensive and where the traditional family safety net isn’t there. Nonetheless your smartest folks, who would be natural community and family leaders, will be that much more likely to move away from the countryside to the big city in search of employment opportunities. The result is a brain drain.

Now in this day and age of technology and remote working arrangements, in theory it ought to be possible to locate outsourcing centers in rural areas. There should be an opportunity to tap into attractive cost structures and a smart, motivated, untapped workforce.

But there are barriers to overcome. How would one jump start the talent pool, in order to get such an organization off on the right foot? What special challenges would come up from training a rural workforce? And would international clients be comfortable trusting work to a location that was difficult to visit?

And yet one way or another, DDD Battambang has managed to overcome these hurdles and create a thriving rural BPO office in the countryside of Cambodia. It’s quiet, it’s peaceful, there’s fresh air. It’s a pleasant place to live.

I think this is just the beginning—rural BPO could have a big impact for many other places, and other services as well.